CFE Virtual Forum Series: Who is ‘Free’ to Speak of “Genocide”?

When the The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls was published, the use of this term “genocide” triggered academic controversy, media frenzy, and strong reactions across Indian country and settler society. The authors of the Report defended their text and were supported in their word choice and rationale by many Indigenous and non-Indigenous voices. However, other commentators claimed the use of the term “genocide” was a distraction from the Report’s substance. Was this a self-defeatingly overblown accusation or a serious misuse of a term defined once and for all in the UN Convention on Genocide in 1949?

Podcast


CFE Virtual Forum Series: Who is ‘Free’ to Speak of “Genocide”? Perspectives on Reclaiming Power and Place

Wednesday May 20, 2020

When the The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls was published, the use of this term “genocide” triggered academic controversy, media frenzy, and strong reactions across Indian country and settler society. The authors of the Report defended their text and were supported in their word choice and rationale by many Indigenous and non-Indigenous voices. However, other commentators claimed the use of the term “genocide” was a distraction from the Report’s substance. Was this a self-defeatingly overblown accusation or a serious misuse of a term defined once and for all in the UN Convention on Genocide in 1949?

Event Details
Share: