Government & Corporate Transparency

The Issue

Canadians’ right of access to information held by governments and public agencies is embarrassingly inadequate. Internationally, the quality of our access to information law ranks 59th out of 102 countries. The implementation of the law makes matters even worse – often imposing excessive delays, high costs, and significant censorship.  Even more limited is the public’s right of access to information about the decisions and practices of the corporate sector that increasingly shape every aspect of our lives.

Why It Matters

Healthy democracy depends on an informed public with ready access to the information it needs to engage in effective political decision-making.

Our Work

The Centre for Free Expression works to promote greater government and corporate transparency through public education and advocacy for better right to know laws and practices. 

Resources
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Upcoming Event: Battling Secrecy

Speaker: Ken Rubin


News: Canada's most secretive local government agency: Toronto Hydro

Toronto Hydro is the 2017 recipient of the Code of Silence Award for Outstanding Achievement in Government Secrecy in the category of local government departments and agencies. 


Commentary: Feds Want a More Restrictive Transparency Regime

By Ken Rubin

Successive bureaucrats have wanted to put dampers on the public use of access to information legislation. Now they have found hope in Bill C-58 and a willing dupe in Treasury Board President Scott Brison.


News: Canada's most secretive federal department: The Treasury Board of Canada

Ottawa's point-man on access-to-information reform, Scott Brison, heads the Treasury Board of Canada which is this year's first recipient of the Code of Silence Award for outstanding achievement in government secrecy. 


News: CFE calls on Prime Minister Trudeau to withdraw badly flawed bill on access to information

CFE requests Bill C-58 be withdrawn as inadequate and, in parts, counter-productive. Canada needs a fresh start and a leader who will champion openness and take transparency seriously.