Blog

Nov 7
2016

On Yelling Fire Falsely in a Crowded Lecture Hall


What are the outer limits to free speech? Oft cited is the example of yelling “fire” in a crowded theatre. University of Toronto psychology professor Jordan Peterson invoked just this image in a contribution to the Washington, D.C.-based paper, The Hill.


By David Schneiderman / Posted Monday November 7, 2016

Academic Freedom, Censorship

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Oct 31
2016

Terrorism Speech Offences Will Undermine Radicalization Prevention Efforts


Many countries are stressing the importance of measures to counter radicalization to violence.  Unfortunately, we really don’t know, at this point, what measures are effective.  So far, the limited research and the experience of other countries have mostly served to show us what is not effective.


By / Posted Monday October 31, 2016

State Surveillance

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Oct 25
2016

Language that is narrowing the public sphere


Opera houses, universities, public schools, civic libraries, and civic museums, all express and explain the societies and cultures from which they come. You might think their antiquity would protect such places from the ups and downs of the economy and the changeable opinions of politicians.

And you would be wrong.

If you look past the placid exteriors of the Royal Ontario Museum or the British Museum, Columbia University, l’Opéra de Paris, the University of Toronto, and the rest, there is a tale of continuous change and occasional disruption.


By William Bruneau / Posted Tuesday October 25, 2016

Academic Freedom

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Oct 19
2016

The Demise of Freedom of Expression


Debates about the regulation of different forms of speech – including hate speech, commercial advertising, election spending, and defamation, raise broader questions about the protection of free speech in contemporary public discourse.


By Richard Moon / Posted Wednesday October 19, 2016

Speech Restrictive Laws

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Oct 12
2016

Piracy, Copyright & Censorship: A Call for Clarity


When I lived in London as a young man, I spent a great deal of time at Speaker’s Corner in Hyde Park, listening to all of the many and varied voices with their many and varied opinions. I agreed with little of what I heard, but I was awfully glad for the public space to go and hear all that disagreeable, often hilarious stuff. I also thought it quite amusing that so many of the speakers brought their own little ladders, stepstools or podiums on which to stand – an extra bit of height lending their opinions a bit more authority, or so they thought.


By John Degen / Posted Wednesday October 12, 2016

Artistic Expression

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Oct 5
2016

A True Canadian Value


Prime Minister Trudeau received plaudits when, on a recent state visit to China, he boasted of Canada’s commitment to free expression, which he presented as a “true Canadian value”. The prime minister exalted “a diversity of ideas, and the free ability to express them” because freedom, he said, is what drives positive change. Perhaps he and others had forgotten that as leader of the Opposition he prohibited anyone opposed to abortion from running for federal office for the Liberal Party. If that was 2014 and this is 2016, there is more.


By Jamie Cameron / Posted Wednesday October 5, 2016

Censorship

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Sep 30
2016

Turning the Clock Back


The decades following the Second World War saw gradually increasing democratization of governments and other organizational structures, including greater protections for freedom of expression in general and academic freedom in particular. The pace of change varied from country to country, with Canada often benefiting from progress in the US and UK in developing its own approaches.


By Jon Thompson / Posted Friday September 30, 2016

Academic Freedom

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Sep 23
2016

Prairie Racism and Free Expression


In the Globe and Mail  for Wednesday, August 31 of this year I encountered a piece by the African American sociologist of sport, Harry Edwards, on quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the American national anthem. The piece was encouragingly framed as a contribution on “Human Rights,” and entitled “Silence is the enemy.” Dr.


By Len Findlay / Posted Friday September 23, 2016

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Sep 19
2016

Compelling Expression?


It is that time of the year again. School has begun, and rules are being made, left, right and centre. Some of us are feeling the relief of sending children and grandchildren off to learn and have fun – and also to get a bit of distance from the “Why? Why? Why?”


By Danielle S. McLaughlin / Posted Monday September 19, 2016

Teachers & Students Speech Rights

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Sep 14
2016

Mind the Metadata


Library and information workers use their education and experience to support intellectual freedom and address social concerns, such as by lobbying for copyright reform for peoples with print disabilities, exposing how commercial Internet filters are biased against sexual and gender minorities, collaborating with social workers on library services for homeless people, and fighting to safeguard cultural heritage in the context of war, conflict, and genocide. Sometimes their work comes down to a single word.


By Toni Samek / Posted Wednesday September 14, 2016

Censorship

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